Blog Articles
02
Is this a “Groundhog Day” sequel? Republicans talking about impeachment? Is it 1998 again?
 
Dan Barkin had an intriguing article in the N&O about several Republican U.S. Senate candidates talking up impeaching President Obama. They fumed about Obama’s alleged high crimes and misdemeanors, not to mention being black, a Democrat and President anyway.
 
Democrats should hope that the Republicans beat this drum. And that Thom Tillis is forced to take a public stand. Tillis wasn’t at the Lake Norman Conservatives forum that Barkin went to; the Speaker routinely ducks Tea Party events.
 
The last time Republicans got riled up about impeachment was, of course, the last time a Democrat was President. That was Bill Clinton, and it all started with some unseemly and unpresidential behavior.
 
The Republicans got obsessed with Clinton’s sex life. Senators Jesse Helms and Lauch Faircloth got hot on the trail. Kenneth Starr launched an in-depth, full-blown (pardon the expressions) federal case.
 
Then-Speaker Newt Gingrich and Later-Briefly-Speaker Robert Livingstone demanded impeachment and denounced Clinton. Later, it turned that they were guilty of similarly sins at precisely the same time. No matter.
 
They saw impeachment as the road to control of Congress in 1998. Lauch Faircloth rode the same horse against John Edwards in North Carolina. Edwards ran as an exemplary family man (this was a long time ago, remember) who thought Washington had its priorities wrong.
 
The GOP strategy backfired. Voters cared more about their lives than Clinton’s sex life. Edwards beat Faircloth. Democrats gained congressional seats in Clinton’s last mid-term election. The impeachment drive fizzled, and both Gingrich and Livingstone left Congress in disgrace.
 
A rerun is just what Democrats need. And Tea Party Republicans are just crazy enough to make our wish come true.
 
Meanwhile: Where do you stand, Thom?

 

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31
Nobody ever runs for office on snow removal, but it’s a sure way to get run out of office.
 
This week the mayor of Atlanta and governor of Georgia are skating on thin ice after a winter storm left thousands of people stranded on the roads. Earlier this month, New York’s new mayor caught flak when some people thought the city’s rich neighborhoods were being cleared faster than other boroughs. Everybody remembers that a big snowstorm ended John Lindsay’s tenure as mayor.
 
Raleigh went through a nightmare a bit like Atlanta’s a few years back. For weeks afterward, city and school officials were slipping and sliding with excuses, explanations and promises to do better next time.
 
And they did. Now, the hint of a snowflake in the forecast and – bam! – schools are cancelled. But at least we’re not stuck on the road for nine hours or at school overnight.
 
Storms bring out the worst in people. They get mad if things shut down and mad if they don’t. And nobody is ever satisfied with how fast the roads get clear.
 
As the AP’s Michael Biesecker noted: “Ah, Facebook. Where anti-tax, anti-annexation, small-government Southerners go to vent when no one plows and salts their roads.”
 
Bad winter weather often catches politicians by surprise, especially if they just took office. They’re not ready. Apparently, they don’t get briefed on that at New Governors’ School. They often stumble by making too-grand promises before it snows.
 
By their second or third winter, they figure out the drill: Put on khakis and a cool-looking jacket. Look like you’re concerned and in command. Get on TV with the guys and gals in uniforms behind you.
 
And hope like hell that it melts fast.

 

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29
Some Republicans probably would like to get Sen. Bill (Mad Dog) Rabon a rabies shot - or get him fixed, if you know what I mean.
 
Rabon’s now-famous rant just shows that, in politics, the worst wounds are self-inflicted. Rabon diminished his own stature, put his bosses in an awkward spot and gave folks more reasons to despise the arrogance in the General Assembly.
 
This bone gives us a lot to chew on.
 
First we have a leading Senator cussing, bragging and boasting about how important he is. Real leaders never have to tell you how important they are.
 
Then Senate leaders say they’ll kill the bill because Mr. Powerful’s comments to his constituents were recorded and made public. That’s public policy by petulance.
 
Apparently, only powerful legislators have the right to speak. But you can’t tape them or quote them.
 
Then we have a Republican legislator suggesting that the Governor and First Lady broke the law by speaking up for the bill. (By the way, good for the McCrorys for caring about puppies. Now what about children whose families can’t get food stamps from DHHS?)
 
Senator Rabon did provide this interesting insight. He said McCrory asked him: “Well, Bill, what in the hell is wrong with a bill that just makes people feel good?”
 
Believe me, there is nothing in this episode that makes people feel good about their leaders in Raleigh.

 

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28
As a boy easily bored in school, I loved snow days. We lived in one of the world’s great sledding locales, just off Canterbury Road in west Raleigh. Every crossing street – Churchill, Lewis Farm, Grant – is a steep hill both ways. We spent hours going down them, going home long after dark.
 
Then you grow up. You get jobs at places where you have to show up on snow days, like newspapers and Governor’s Offices. You have to fetch kids from school, then keep them entertained at home. I learned why my mother was happy to let the four of us sled ourselves to exhaustion.
 
Now, as empty-nesters, snow days are welcome again. An excuse to stay home beckons. You can work there perfectly well; that’s why Al Gore invented the Internet. And no kids strewing wet coats, hats, gloves and boots across the floor every couple of hours.
 
Some people stock up on bread, milk and toilet paper. We check the red wine supply. We debated evacuating to the beach, where up to 10 inches is predicted. But our place there is small. With two people and two dogs, it could be like “The Shining.”
 
One day, though, I want to watch snow fall on Jockey’s Ridge and the Roanoke Sound.
 
My cousin Karen is probably amused by all this. She grew up and lived all her life in Rochester and Buffalo. Just a few months ago she, her husband and their dogs moved to the Charlotte area. I’m sure she’s laughing at us cancelling school before a flake falls, rushing to stock up like the End Days are nigh and tuning in to 24-hours Stormaggedon news coverage.
 
So now it’s time to chill out, curl up and watch it pile up. But let’s have a thought for other people. Like utility linemen out in the dark and cold making sure you have lights and heat. Like police officers, fire fighters and paramedics who are out there for us. Yes, even like news people who have to be there.
 
And people who aren’t lucky enough to have heat and warmth. Or a roof over their heads and a warm bed to lie in.
 
As you watch the President, the politicians and the pundits tonight talk about poverty, inequality, unemployment and the politics of it all, remember that there are people out in the cold.
 

 

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27
Don’t you suspect there’s an email to the effect of “Time for some voting problems for Democrats”?
 
Why else would 13 Republican legislators try to quash subpoenas for any documents they have related to the “rationale, purpose and implementation” of the state’s new voter ID law?
 
This, you recall, is the same crowd that promised greater openness and transparency in government. Then cheered when their allies at the Civitas Institute demanded emails, phone records and calendars from Gene Nichol, director of the school’s poverty center. Nichol’s sin is that he has been outspokenly critical of the Republican regime.
 
Now, I’ll grant you that Democrats were in power in Raleigh so long that they abused their power. But the Republicans are sure catching up fast.
 
Hypocrisy, as much as money, is the mother’s milk of politics.

 

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24
50 years ago we declared war on poverty, spent $20.7 trillion, and lost. So now the President is trying again. Only this time he’s calling it a war on income inequality because a war on poverty only appeals to folks who are poor while a war on income inequality appeals to just about everyone except, maybe, Bill Gates or Warren Buffet.
 
Now you’d think the President would start by attacking the root causes of the income inequality. But politics doesn’t work that way. Because what politicians are interested  in is votes – and taking money from one group of folks and giving it to another is a proven plan that works at the ballot box.  But like a lot of modern politics it does little to fix the root of the problem.
 
The other day in the newspaper Robert Rector reported there are now 80 means-tested welfare programs that take $916 billion from one group of folks and give it to 100 million other folks. Despite that poverty rates haven’t dropped but, on the other hand, poverty is not what it used to be. Today, our typical poor soul lives in a house or apartment in good repair with air-conditioning and cable TV that is larger than the house of an average non-poor soul in France, England or Germany. He has a car, TVs and a DVD player. There’s a fifty-fifty chance he has a computer. A one in three chance he has a big flat screen TV. And, thankfully, a big majority of today’s poor are not undernourished and didn’t endure a day of hunger over the previous year.
 
Still, no one doubts there are still people who need a helping hand – which led Mr. Rector to a surprising fact: Fifty-one years ago, the year before we declared war on poverty, 6% of America’s children were born out of wedlock. Today 41% of our children are born out of wedlock. Now, why on earth should a child’s mother and father not marrying make a farthing’s difference when it comes to how much a child earns when he (or she)  grows up?
 
The answer’s a mystery but statistics don’t lie and they say children raised in single parent homes are four times more likely to be poor, and children who grow up without a father at home are 50% more likely to be poor when they grow up.
 
It sounds illogical but the numbers say more traditional families mean less poverty. But for a politician in pursuit of votes that turns a simple political opportunity into a knotty intellectual problem.
 
One more fact: Today when a mother on welfare has the good fortune to fall in love with a man who has a job and marries him she loses her benefits. Now, in a way, that’s logical. But if you’re a single mother who may be losing, say, $10,000 in benefits it’s also 10,000 reasons not to marry the man of your dreams.

 

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24
Whenever you think political discourse can’t get coarser, somebody comes along and proves you wrong. Especially super-PACs, which are basically piggy banks for political consultants who make big bucks by making over-the-top ads that make the people writing the checks happy but flop with voters. (See: Karl Rove, Crossroads GPS, 2012 elections.)
 
Carter and I got to talking about the hyperbole, overstatement and over-the-top rhetoric. We both have a suspicion that voters are on to the game; as soon as they hear the dark music and voice of doom that scream “political ad,” they tune out. Then Carter sent me some research that bears out our suspicion.
 
The Global Strategy Group studied the question: “How can candidates be more believable when talking about their opponents?” It concluded: “Cut the hyperbole, exaggeration and name-calling.” It elaborated:
 
“Eliminating hyperbole, embellishment and exaggeration leads to more credible messaging about opponents
 
“Given the need to break through, campaigns often dial up the heat to make their message as incendiary as possible. But our research shows that doing so makes messages less credible and thus less effective. Voters react better when there is no hyperbole or extraneous name-calling.
 
“GSG asked voters about a series of descriptions of their member of Congress. Half of voters heard descriptions with adjectives that summed up the negative with a pointed characterization, while the other half heard descriptions that did not include the additional adjectives.
 
“When asked if their member of Congress ‘has positions that are not moderate and lack common sense,’ 49% of voters agree the statement is true. But when asked if their member ‘has extreme and radical positions that are not moderate and lack common sense,’ just 27% agree – a 22-point decrease in believability. Similarly, when asked if their member ‘is a career politician who uses the title and office for personal financial gain,’ 52% agree. However, when asked if the member ‘is a corrupt career politician who uses the title and office for personal financial gain,’ just 31% agree – a 21-point drop.
 
“Eliminating hyperbole in ways beyond the characterization of an opponent also boosts credibility. Fifty-seven percent of voters say it is true that their member ‘hasn’t accomplished very much, and someone else could be more effective,’ but just 48% agree when the statement says their member ‘hasn’t accomplished anything at all, and someone else could be more effective’.”
 
One of the plagues of modern campaigns is consultants out to prove the’re the toughest SOBs in town. Their tough talk might impress their clients. But voters see through it.

 

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22
From a message point of view, the rollout of McCrory 2.0 was a mess – and a missed opportunity for the Governor.
 
McCrory might have heeded his “mentor” Jim Hunt and called for a sustained three-year effort to raise teacher salaries to the national average.  Instead, he vaguely promised some kind of pay raise for this year only, gave no details and refused to endorse Hunt’s plan.
 
Whew! Democrats dodged a bullet.
 
Instead of a bold, focused stroke that seized public imagination and reshaped the political landscape, McCrory opted for a multi-themed “2014 PrioritiesPalooza!”
 
He offered a laundry list of government-speak: teacher pay raises (for some teachers), fracking and offshore drilling (gee, what could go wrong there?), revamping Medicaid (ditto), fixing DHHS, reining in puppy mills, less drugs and alcohol on college campus (but more guns), nicer state government buildings and “art on the move” (paintings, not Pope).
 
The choreography was odd. He, his Cabinet and senior team sat around a table in the ornate Executive Mansion, with an elaborate chandelier looming behind the Governor. From one camera angle, he was in front of a plush love seat that looked like a throne.
 
For Democrats, McCrory offered up a smorgasbord of political targets. But, most of all, they’ll say he’s not doing enough to get teacher pay out of the national basement. And they can say his happy talk about the “Carolina Comeback” ignores people who can’t find jobs and can’t make ends meet.
 
Then there was his somewhat baffling question: “Is DHHS too big to succeed?”  Well, it’s clearly not too big to fail.
 
In the end, the whole production mattered very little. Only one thing does: What does Senator Berger want?

 

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21
Back when General Washington whipped King George the old saying ‘A penny saved is a penny earned’ was a bit of folk wisdom hardly a soul disagreed with – but these days modern economists have determined that kind of old-fashioned virtue is really a vice and that the true path to prosperity is borrowing – which is why the economists were tickled pink when they saw the headline the other week that read: ‘Consumer borrowing rose $18.2 billion in October.'
 
At last the long moribund ‘consumer-driven economy’ was showing signs of life.
 
Of course, this new modern idea of virtue is a little odd – after all, it leaves American families $18 billion deeper in the hole. But the masters of economics have no doubt they’re right – even though their turning virtue upside down hasn’t worked out too well over the last few years.

 

 

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21
A TAPster who spent years working in economic development shares this:
 
“The most astonishing news last week (other than the daily calamities at DHHS) was the invitation we received via email to attend a fundraiser in Raleigh for the governor of South Carolina. Yes, the head sandlapper is coming to Raleigh to raise money at the behest of a Raleigh lobbyist.
 
“Huh?
 
“Why would any North Carolina lobbyist think this is a good idea and why would any North Carolinian attend and give money? Gov. Haley leads an administration that is agile and effective when recruiting new business and jobs to her state. She and her team are kicking North Carolina’s butt all over the place in the industrial recruiting wars, and won’t think twice about luring away our existing businesses, aggressively wooing our prospects with big incentive packages we can’t match, or starting the Civil War again if that seems necessary.
 
“What we need is a road block at South of the Border and a strong dose of reality in Raleigh.”

 

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Carter & Gary
 
Carter Wrenn
 
 
Gary Pearce
 
 
The Charlotte Observer says: “Carter Wrenn and Gary Pearce don’t see eye-to-eye on many issues. But they both love North Carolina and know its politics inside and out.”
 
Carter is a Republican. 
Gary is a Democrat.
 
They met in 1984, during the epic U.S. Senate battle between Jesse Helms and Jim Hunt. Carter worked for Helms and Gary, for Hunt.
 
Years later, they became friends. They even worked together on some nonpolitical clients.
 
They enjoy talking about politics. So they started this blog in 2005. 
 
They’re still talking. And they invite you to join the conversation.
 
 
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