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Entries for 'Gary Pearce'

17
In the state where President Obama had his closest win in 2008 and his closest loss in 2012, why wouldn’t the U.S. Senate race be tight as a tick?
 
Carter has posted a great series of blogs about the race (although he’s wrong on the education issue). My other favorite blogger, Thomas Mills, weighed in on the “State of the Race.” I’m up!
 
Without the benefit of a good poll (see my blog yesterday), I’m guessing. So I base my guess on watching what the campaigns are doing – and trying to decipher what they think is happening.
 
First Hagan. Her real feat is that she’s even in this race, let alone tied or just ahead. Given that it’s Obama’s second midterm election and given how low his job ratings are, she could be toast. But she and her team have run a great campaign, far better than Tillis’. They made Tillis and his legislative record the issue. Now, as they fend off the last-minute attacks that feed on fears about ISIS and Ebola, they are focused like a laser on women: yes, issues like defunding Planned Parenthood, but also education, health care, minimum wage and special interests vs. the middle class. They know that women will decide this election, especially women in the big counties. And they have a huge field operation that is also focused on those voters, as Thomas notes.
 
Tillis’ team looked for a long time like the gang that couldn’t shoot straight. Now they think they’ve found the target: national security. They believe voters will vote against Hagan because she missed a hearing on ISIS, and they either have evidence it works or have convinced themselves it works.
 
(Of course, if members of Congress going to congressional hearings kept us safe, we’d be safe from ISIS, Ebola and everything up to and including “Zoos: Wild Animal Attacks.” Congress has about a 16 percent approval rating. Do we care who in Congress goes to what hearings to pose, preen and pontificate?)
 
The question is whether new and insiderish information now, when voters are saturated in ads and conflicting claims, will cut through. And Hagan’s response is, in effect, that she went to ISIS hearings more often than she voted with Obama.
 
Which brings us to Obama. Now, I think he’s been a great President. He stopped an economic meltdown, started a recovery, reduced the deficit, gave millions more people health care and kept us from doing stupid things overseas – all in the face of Republican die-harders who would wreck the country just to oppose him. But he does it with so little passion he looks passive. He has made the challenge for Hagan and other Democrats immeasurably harder. Especially as we go through our media-induced Great National Ebola Freakout.
 
For all of you souls in the campaign war rooms, I feel your pain. I’ve been there through those long final days. Sometimes we knew we were winning, sometimes we knew we were losing and sometimes we didn’t know what the hell was happening.
 
But it will be over in 18 days. Then you can enjoy all us bloggers, commentators and Wednesday-morning quarterbacks picking you apart.
 
Salut!

 

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16
Francis DeLuca at Civitas took issue with my blog about their polls (“Cooking Numbers at Civitas.”) He tweeted (@fxdeluca): “@jgaryp thanks for the follow! But don't appreciate your comments about Civitas polling! #youknowbetter.”
 
Here’s what I know. When the late Jack Hawke was at Civitas, he worked hard to give their polls credibility. But that credibility was stretched thin when Civitas put out a “flash poll” saying Tom Bradshaw (who I’m working for) led John Alexander by 52-36, then hours later sent out “a corrected version of today’s flash poll,” saying the lead actually was 10 points. No explanation was given for the correction.
 
Sorry, Francis; it smelled fishy.
 
This is just one example of why the plethora of polls this time in a campaign is more confusing than enlightening. There are so many polls in the news. Sometimes they’re consistent; sometimes they vary widely. How do you sort through them?
 
I’ve been looking at polls for 40 years now, and here’s my advice. First ask whether a poll has an institutional attachment (or big funder) that might influence the findings – or how the findings are reported. Then look at whether it used live callers or automated calls (IVR). Robo-polls can’t call cell phones, and 20-25 percent or more of voters may use only a cell phone.
 
Finally, ask yourself: Was the sponsor motivated to do the poll to get good information – or just get publicity for themselves? Would they spend the extra money it takes to do a good poll, or do it on the cheap to get a headline?
 
And a word to candidates and their campaigns. If you’re spending the money it takes to get good polls – and you should be – take public polls with a huge helping of salt. Take this advice from Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado, who won in 2010 after public polls showed him losing, though his own pollster had shown him ahead: “Trust your pollster. If you don’t, you’ll go crazy.”

 

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15
Stop the presses. I have something nice to say about Governor McCrory.
 
Unlike his Republican colleagues Thom Tillis, Phil Berger and Dan Forrest, McCrory said he will respect and obey the court decision on gay marriage, even if he doesn’t like it.
 
Good for him.
 
But why? I asked a couple of smart political people. One (a kind-hearted soul) said: “I don’t think he’s a mean person at all.” Another (a cynical sort) offered: “He needs every vote in 2016.”
 
Here’s a third theory: Duke Energy. Yes, his former employer, which may be his biggest obstacle to reelection because of the coal ash spill.
 
The theory: working almost 30 years for a large corporation taught McCrory the importance of diversity and tolerance. It’s not that corporations are nice people, it’s that they value smart, hard-working employees regardless of sexual orientation.
 
Whatever the reason, McCrory’s stance is a welcome change from fulminations about “activist judges,” “judicial tyranny” and “60 percent of North Carolinians voted for the amendment.”
 
Well, 60 years ago, 60 percent of North Carolina voters would have voted for racial segregation. That didn’t make it morally right or constitutional. The reason we have judges and courts, as the conservatives usually remind us, is to protect individual liberty against the tyranny of the majority.
 
So it is here.

 

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15
Some perspective on the breathless reports that the National Republican Senatorial Committee is pumping another $6.5 million into Thom Tillis’ campaign: What does that buy, and what does it get you with still-undecided voters?
 
On the buy, it gets you about half what it would get you if you had bought the time weeks or months ago. TV ads are based on the free enterprise system. When demand goes up, the cost goes up. So a spot that you could have bought before for, say, $500 now costs you $1,000.
 
Then the second question: Given the flood of ads, from the Senate race and other campaigns, is anything new getting through to voters now?
 
Hagan’s campaign bet on spending big early. Tillis and his allies are betting big on spending late. We’ll see who’s right.

 

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14
I miss Jamie. I miss her smile, her laugh and the parties she threw. This campaign season, I’ve missed her political smarts and fundraising skills. A lot of candidates could have used her.
 
So this weekend I’ll join a lot of people – many who knew her and miss her and many who didn’t know her but were moved by her – at the Jamie Kirk Hahn Foundation’s Weekend of Purpose. You’re invited too, to Saturday’s day of service, that night’s celebration and Sunday’s brunch at Poole’s. Get information and tickets here.
 
The Foundation has wisely begun a strategic planning process for the future, but – as Jamie would have it – hasn’t waited to get to work. Established just a year ago, it’s already having an impact, without spending much of the money it has raised.
 
That has happened through its Raleigh Food Corridor campaign; the Gathering for Good series; the Second Saturday celebrations of food, entrepreneurs and policy; and service projects with the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle, Raleigh City Farm, Activate Good, and the NC Fair Share Community Development Corporation.
 
Most important, it's making good on the promise to mobilize an Army of Jamies, led by her husband Nation, Executive Director Alexis Trost and an extraordinary board that includes Jamie’s parents and leaders like Joyce Fitzpatrick, Chris Sgro and Ken Lewis.
 
Coming less than three weeks before a big election, the celebration is a reminder that the work of helping people and building North Carolina doesn’t just happen in campaigns or in government.
 
As she did in her too-short life, Jamie Kirk Hahn is still inspiring people to do great things.

 

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14
America’s Great Ebola Freakout has produced some good lines:
 
“I wasn’t afraid of Ebola here until McCrory’s press conference lineup today reminded me that he, Wos and Tata are the ones protecting us from it. God help us.”
 
“Sarah Palin demanded today that President Obama protect America and invade Ebola.”

 

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13
First ISIS. Then Ebola. Now men marring men and women marrying women. What’s next? “Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria!”?
 
More to the point, will video and big Page One pictures of newlywed men kissing each other sway this election?
 
Consider three things here.
 
First, yes, Amendment One passed with 60 percent of the vote. Two years ago. In a primary election with no big race. This is a general election with a big US Senate race and a lot of hot legislative races. Public opinion has moved fast since then, and same-sex marriages are happening all over the country.
 
Second, some number of the votes for Amendment One were African-American voters. They are more religious than most voters, they go to church more and their churches often are evangelical. Quite a few black preachers preached against same-sex marriage in 2010. It’s safe to say these voters will not be voting Republican in 2014.
 
Third, what’s the impact in precisely the urban areas with big college populations where sentiment runs strongest against the Republican legislature? Will these younger, college-educated voters stay home now, content that all is well? Or will this just galvanize an even bigger vote as they see that change is within their reach?
 
My guess is that same-sex marriage is at worst a wash for Democrats and very possibly a plus.

 

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10
As Halloween and early voting draw near, we political wizards examine entrails, cut up bats’ tails and consult the moon and stars to predict what will happen. (Translation: We trade rumors about polls, rumored polls and rumored rumors.)
 
Sometimes, you seek signs in what candidates do.
 
Take Thom Tillis. He increasingly looks like a losing quarterback hurling Hail Mary passes at the end of the game. Soon he’ll accuse Senator Hagan of sending federal stimulus dollars to Ebola-infected ISIS warriors so they can cross the Mexican border to get gay-marriage licenses in North Carolina. 
 
But some smart people look at real numbers. The smartest person when it comes to election numbers is Gerry Cohen, the retired General Assembly counsel. On his Facebook page, Cohen wrote:
 
“Wake County Board of Elections reports getting thousands of new voter registrations each day. Election Director says new registration is running at presidential election level and they are 10,000 forms behind. Wake has announced that completed registration forms can be dropped at any Wake County Public Library til 5 pm Friday. This folks clearly is a wave election in Wake. In fact, #‎WakeTidalWave.”
 
The numbers come from Colin Campbell’s N&O story about today being the last day of voter registration.

 

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08
The after-debate on who won is more interesting than the debates themselves.
 
You can rely on the partisans to declare victory. The media focuses on substance, issues and fact checks, none of which anybody is interested in. The stories are predictable: Candidates “clashed…traded jabs… repeated talking points…didn’t say anything new…etc.”
 
This year the popular term is “game-changer,” as in “this debate was no game-changer.”
 
Another popular trope is to say the moderator was the only winner, which is a three-fer: You avoid reaching a conclusion, you dismiss both candidates and you suck up to a big media personality.
 
The experts who get quoted have no real-world experience in campaigns and aren’t equipped to keep score. Anyway, it always takes several days for a consensus to set in on who won and who lost.
 
Take the Aiken-Ellmers and Hagan-Tillis debates. As an experiment, I watched the first and followed Twitter for the second.
 
A lot of people watched to see Clay Aiken; nobody cared about seeing Renee Ellmers. They just wanted to see if he was a joke or serious. Old hands I respect were impressed by him, but some people thought he was too caustic. A lot of people commented on his hair.
 
My take: He did well because he showed that he’s smart and serious. And the hair? Well, I haven’t seen a pompadour like that since Jim Hunt ran in 1976. As for Congresswoman Ellmers, she looked like a non-swimmer caught in a rip tide.
 
(Full disclosure: I worked for Aiken in the primary. But I made a commitment to help my friend Tom Bradshaw in his NC Senate race, and I no longer have the energy or bandwith to do more than one race.)
 
From Twitter, I take it that Hagan was crisper, stronger and more effective this time. Thom Tillis should fire his handlers for missing the most basic of all debate-prep questions: Name one issue where you differ with your party.
 
Oh well, there’s always tomorrow’s debate. Maybe we’ll have a meltdown. Or an explosion. Or at least a game-changer.

 

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07
Some North Carolina politicians sound today just like their predecessors in the 1950s, railing against the Supreme Court and rallying behind “state’s rights.”
 
Then it was racial discrimination. Today it’s same-sex marriage. Then – as today – the politicians were on the wrong side of history.
 
They say the state’s ban on gay marriages passed with 60 percent of the vote. Yes it did. In a primary two years ago. Want to try it again in a general election?
 
We may. We should see a sharp contrast tonight between Thom Tillis and Kay Hagan. If voters vote on this one issue – and some will – they’ll have a clear choice.
 
Yesterday, Tillis stood united with Senator Berger (for the first time in a while). They promised to resist the court ruling. Meanwhile, Governor McCrory say he would “respect” the decision, even though he didn’t agree with it. (Any bets on whether we will see any “recalculating” – as the GPS lady says – from the Gov?)
 
Last night, it was striking how gingerly both Renee Ellmers and Clay Aiken handled the issue. And Aiken reminded voters that Ellmers opposed the ban in 2012, as did he.
 
While tonight’s debate won’t provide nearly as entertaining overall as Aiken vs. Ellmers, this exchange could prove decisive November 4.

 

 

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