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31
Thanks to a TAPster who remembers the 1980s for this one:
 
 
“(North Carolina Congressman) Patrick McHenry is listed as an organizer of a new joint fundraising committee named – drum roll – Whip It Good PAC.  At first I thought it was a joke, but apparently not.”
 
 
For those not familiar with the Devo song and video “Whip It,” enjoy.
 
 
Whip it, Patrick.

 

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30
Going back to the days of Terry Sanford and Jim Hunt, Young Democrats were a breeding ground for extraordinary leaders. But the current crop may become the best ever.
 
I spent several hours in Chapel Hill Saturday morning at the annual state convention of YDs, College Dems and Teen Dems. They are just as smart, capable and determined as their predecessors. They are extremely focused, serious and hard-headed in their politics.
 
They know the party faces tough challenges in North Carolina, so they’re free of the overconfidence and sometimes-overweening personal ambition of some past YDs. Above all, they are committed to Service with a capital S.
 
One panel, far too brief, featured eight young Democrats who hold elected office across the state, including Wake County Commissioners Matt Calabria and Jessica Holmes. Each panelist had four minutes to talk about the rewards and challenges of running for and serving in public office. They should have had 20 minutes each.
 
I was on a panel just before them, serving as the designated Old White Guy. The last question to us was whether the Democratic Party has a strong bench of talent. Judging from Saturday, the clear answer is Yes.
 
Being there did more than pump me up. It told me this crowd is ready. They get that the Democratic Party has to update its message for a new state, a new generation and a new economy. They understand how data, analytics and social media are transforming political communications and organization.
 
They don’t see themselves as “leaders of the future.” They’re ready now. Older Democrats need to be ready for them. If they aren’t, they should be pushed aside. And I’ll help push.

 

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27
After capturing the capital the rebels are now hurtling toward Aden.     
 
The President’s fled. No one knows where he is. Or if he’s in the country.
 
And the rebels have put a $100,000 bounty on his head.  
 
Our Embassy’s been shuttered. Our troops have been evacuated.
 
Saudi Arabia’s making airstrikes but it looks like it’s too late.
 
Last fall, President Obama hailed Yemen as a prime example of his success in the battle to stop terrorists like ISIS.
 
Now, in Yemen, the terrorists have all but won.
 
In Washington, the best President’s press spokesman can do is say, ‘We call on them to stop the instability and violence.’
 
And we’re a pretty long way from the days when Presidents ‘walked softly and carried a big stick.’


 

 

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27
We’re going to have to start thinking before we hit Send, Share or Post.
 
Hillary Clinton’s campaign has spent a couple of weeks wallowing in a media mudbath over her State Department emails. Jeb Bush pounced on her. Then we found his staff deep-sixed many of his emails.
 
Roy Cooper called for more open government. Then the Republican Party called on him to release 14 years of his emails. Good thing Roy’s folks didn’t ask my advice. I’d say, “Screw ‘em. It’s a political stunt and a waste of taxpayers’ money.”
 
The latest advance in opposition research is scouring the social media profiles of newly hired campaign staffers, many of whom have posted statements and photos that don’t read so well or look so amusing in retrospect. A few promising careers crashed as a result.
 
How would you like someone examining every email you’ve sent, plus every online post, picture and hot-headed comment?
 
Carter and I may well have posted blogs that we would regret today. But writing a longer post, as opposed to a quick, a Facebook retort or a 140-characer tweet, usually gives you time to realize that what you’re saying is best left unsaid.
 
As super-lawyer Edward Bennett Williams once observed, “Nothing is frequently a very good thing to do and always a brilliant thing to say.”

 

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26
Folks who vote in Republican primaries, if asked, will tell you they’re Conservative and most will firmly add they’re Very Conservative as opposed to A Little Conservative.
 
In the uncompromising depth of his conservative beliefs, Ted Cruz is their cup of tea.
 
But…
 
It’s hard to put your finger on that ‘but…’ but instead of marching onto the Presidential battlefield at the head of an army of Conservatives, Cruz trails Scott Walker and Rand Paul.    
 
National Review published an article by Charles Cooke that may touch on the reason why.
 
Mr. Cooke described the first time he heard Cruz speak: He listened, agreed, admired Cruz’s intelligence, never doubted his sincerity but added, For all his obvious talent Cruz’s rhetorical style frankly makes my hair curl a little.
 
He heard both Cruz and Marco Rubio speak a year later: The audience, he wrote, was more excited to hear Cruz – but after the speeches that changed.
 
Rubio talks to you – Cruz seemed to lecture, one attendee told him.
 
Ted Cruz is a dyed-in-the-wool conservative running in a primary full of two-fisted conservative voters and being tough and smart and sincere may be all it takes at the end of the day. But… how you explain your beliefs matters and a glimmer of conversation, and speaking to people rather than at them, might be the fuel to ignite Ted Cruz’s campaign.


 

 

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25
Sometimes in politics you have to rise above principle.
 
Republicans vow to resist fight President Obama’s “redistributionist” economic policies. Then GOP legislators plot to redistribute sales tax revenues from urban (Democratic) to rural (Republican) counties.
 
Senator Ted Cruz vows to repeal Obamacare. Then he signs up for insurance under Obamacare.
 
Governor McCrory pledged to end the corrupt, secretive practices of his Democratic predecessors. Then he repeatedly fails to accurately report his financial affairs.
 
Legislative Republicans promised to end the partisan machinations of their Democratic predecessors. Then they gerrymander congressional and legislative elections and then move on to county and municipal elections.
 
John Hood has a timely warning in his blog about the unintended consequences of monkeying with elections: “…my message to today’s North Carolina Republicans is this: change an electoral rule if it makes sense on the merits, but don’t do it assuming that your party will benefit. Back in the day, Democrats checked their swing. Now they’re glad they did.”

 

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25
Yesterday in Mosul, the New York Times reports, a man and woman were handcuffed then stoned by ISIS for adultery.
 
Later in the day ISIS took three young men from their uncle’s home and beheaded then in a public street after hearing a rumor the uncle had met with a Kurdish leader.


 

 

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24
With the Irish Prime Minister sitting beside him, Obama said Republicans are against education. Infrastructure. Research. The things needed to create jobs. National defense. And the middle class.
 
Then having thrown down the gauntlet, and concisely summed up how he felt about the Republican budget, the President rolled out the welcome mat for the Prime Minister.
 
Next I turned to a stack of newspaper clippings about Jeb Bush, Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and Scott Walker – looking for an answer to Obama.
 
Walker was criticizing unions.
 
Cruz was criticizing Obama’s deal with Iran.  
 
Paul was talking about criminal justice reform.
 
And Bush was saying it’s the President’s job to reweave civility into political discourse.
 
Answering Obama would have been as simple as saying, If you don’t agree with the President about how big the federal government ought to be – he says you’re against the middle class. Now, does that really make sense?  
 
But no voice took up the gauntlet.


 

 

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23
Ex-Congressman Barney Frank suggests this slogan for Democrats: “We’re not perfect, but they’re nuts.”
 
Take the GOP’s hard-line opposition to Loretta Lynch’s nomination as Attorney General. On one of Sunday’s talk shows, a Republican said the Senate shouldn’t even vote on her nomination. Why? Because, he said, she’ll continue the policies of current AG Eric Holder.
 
Help me here. If the Senate doesn’t confirm Lynch, then Holder stays on, right? And pursues the same policies as now, right? The policies that President Obama wants his AG, whoever he or she is, to pursue. Right?
 
How does refusing Lynch an up-or-down vote change that?

 

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23
Pat and Phil don’t gee and haw.
 
Awhile back, after the Coal Ash Spill, Pat went to work cleaning up the mess, then Phil  passed a bill to have a Commission take over the job – which got Pat’s hackles up.
 
Pat said the Constitution was written in black and white and no one could run the clean-up but the Governor – and sued. And a three judge panel agreed: Phil and the leaders of the State House had thrown the Constitution out the window – which got Phil’s dander up.
 
He said that the court was wrecking the way NC government had been run for 100 years then he and House Speaker Tim Moore appealed the ruling to the Supreme Court – then the fireworks started.
 
Senate Rules Committee Chairman and A-force-to-be-Reckoned-With Tom Apodaca cancelled every Senate hearing to confirm Pat’s appointees. He put the hearings for the head of the SBI, the Banking Commission and the Industrial Commission on ice.
 
In the middle of the rhubarb the Secretary of Commerce trooped over to the Senate and testified that Pat urgently, desperately, immediately needed more money for ‘incentives’ – so he could make deals with corporations to bring jobs to NC.
 
Phil sent Pat’s plan straight to Apodaca’s Rules Committee where it may sit until frogs grow wings – then introduced his own plan (a tax cut).
 
Pat fired back that Phil’s plan would “break the bank,” leaving the state in dire financial straits.
 
Phil shot back Pat wanted to give corporations a billion dollars in incentives while he’d only cut taxes $500 million – so how could he be the one ‘breaking the bank?’
 
The number two Republican in the Senate, Harry Brown, then waded in. He said it was time Pat faced the music: He’d drained the incentives fund dry and now he was trying to dodge responsibility. Pat had given 90% of the incentives money to the three richest counties, including Pat’s own county, and it was time to give the other 97 counties some respect.  
 
Across town, the same day, speaking to an auditorium full of mayors and city councilmen, Pat tackled Phil’s ham-handed politics head-on.
 
Last fall Republicans lost every County Commissioner race in Wake County (Raleigh). So, as soon as the Senate got back to town, it passed a bill to redraw every county commissioner’s district. To elect more Republicans.
 
Pat told the mayors and city councilmen that some legislators in Raleigh didn’t just want to be legislators, they wanted to be mayors and city councilmen as well. But if they wanted to run local government they ought to run for city council.
 
The way Phil’s supporters see it he’s the real McCoy. A true conservative. Who doesn’t just talk the talk – he passes bills that cut taxes and spending. While Pat’s prone to trip over his own feet and say, Slow down. Don’t cut too much.
 
The way Pat’s supporters see it Phil’s power hungry – and prone to deal with anyone standing in his way with ham-handed ruthlessness. Which has made the Senate unpopular. Which means fighting Phil makes Pat popular.


 

 

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Carter & Gary
 
Carter Wrenn
 
 
Gary Pearce
 
 
The Charlotte Observer says: “Carter Wrenn and Gary Pearce don’t see eye-to-eye on many issues. But they both love North Carolina and know its politics inside and out.”
 
Carter is a Republican. 
Gary is a Democrat.
 
They met in 1984, during the epic U.S. Senate battle between Jesse Helms and Jim Hunt. Carter worked for Helms and Gary, for Hunt.
 
Years later, they became friends. They even worked together on some nonpolitical clients.
 
They enjoy talking about politics. So they started this blog in 2005. 
 
They’re still talking. And they invite you to join the conversation.
 
 
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